Usually, you say “symphony”, and I say “cacophony”

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I recently went to the symphony with Hoss, because we are oh so cosmopolitan. We did ourselves up, Hoss in a suave tuxedo, I in a hicky plaid shirt and bow tie. The show was at a church, which was a little too holy for me.

It was not so nearly impressionistic in actuality.

It was not so nearly impressionistic in actuality.

Dvorak and Beethoven were on the docket, the Dvorak being dark and Slavic, and the Beethoven full of joie de vivre. An old man sitting beside me who couldn’t see gave me a lecture on the necessity of perseverance. Besides the despicable affectations of genius that a viola player feigned by romantic lolls of his head, it was an enjoyable night.

There was an intermission, during which I ate a skewered marshmallow, brownie, strawberry snack with as much decorum as one can whilst eating a sticky, gooey spear.

The second part of the show consisted of the Beethoven. The symphony was lucky to share the stage with the Lehnert Trio, who are a pretty big deal in Colorado. Oswald, the father-husband-violinist, and Oswald Jr., the son-bassist needed to re-tune their instruments to the sounds of the spheres, but Doris, the mother-wife-pianist was on point.

When she took the stage, I was kind of astounded by her presence. She wore a blue dress-suit that sparkled in the lights above. In her silver hair she had a glimmering hair clip, with dangling earrings to match. She smiled at me when she sat down at her grand piano, which disarmed me.

She played fantastically with an energy that was fascinating to watch. She bobbed her head as well, not with affectation, but with sincerity of emotion. Her fingers pounded the keys like lightning bolts from the cosmos. Yes, exactly that. She played with the exhibition of a rock star, and the expertise of a craftsmen.

– Professor Rhadamanthus, Esq.

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When I go to a show I now expect stilt walkers or its a no-go

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We were looking for something fun to do for the weekend, so we checked the listings. We saw a band’s name that struck our interest. Hoss and I did a little Googling, as we are wont to do.

And we saw their motherfucking video right here:

(You can check out the rest of the MarchFourth Marching Band’s videos here)

It goes without saying that we were hooked. We dressed up, (they seemed like the kind of band you would want to dress up for) Hoss in a golden vest and me in my leather daddy jacket and my Dresden Dolls-style stockings. I had blue hair at the time, so that helped too.

We went to the bar across from the street to drink a couple margaritas and dry-heave a little. Hoss was drunk and feeling generous, so he gave his flask of gin to houseless woman, and we got into the show, stumbling, ready to party.

And we motherfucking did.

Straight up, MarchFourth Marching Band was the coolest show that I have ever seen, and Hoss agrees. There were motherfucking acrobats, contortionists, burlesque dancers, and maybe some fire-eaters? I don’t know, I was wasted.

The band had a very ska-y sound, and it was shit that you could skank to with abandon and loss yourself in. They played as if they were having fun, and that transmuted to the crowd. And, when they played their cover of Nirvana’s “In Bloom”, I completely lost. My. Shit. The brass was a explosive and my ears were bleeding with awesomeness. The performance artists added an element of authentic, human spectacle that can’t be achieved by the light shows and pyrotechnics of most shows.

Then something cool happened. Hoss, overcome by the sheer awesomeness, started shouting “HOLY SHIT, HOLY SHIT!”

People had been drinkin’, so they started cheering it too. The band noticed, and they cheered it back to the crowd, and started playing with a new fervor. They rocked our asses off again.

Then something magical happened. A fucking unicorn – kidding. No, the drummers jumped down from the stage into the audience. So, not only were there was great music and great performances, there was also a transgression of that invisible wall between the talent and the fans. The musicians were in the trenches, beating on the drums, in range for the crowd to blow kisses to them.

It’s cool when you see an awesome band with lots of talent. It is another thing completely when you see an awesome, talented band that grooves on connecting with its audience.